Where are they now: Chris Anderson

Chris Anderson will always hold a special place in Melbourne Storm history.

That was made certain on an overcast September afternoon in 1999 when he successfully coached the Club to its first ever NRL Premiership.

In the space of just two years he took a Victorian rugby league team from competition new-boys to top of the world.

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Nowadays after 337 NRL games as a coach (10th most all-time), Anderson runs a successful Labour Hire company.

That has occupied much of his time since officially leaving the NRL in 2007.

It is an entirely new challenge he now faces but one in which he finds striking similarities with his past life.

“I have developed a really keen interest in the business world so I find that occupies most of my time now,” Anderson said.

“There are a lot of things that cross over between rugby league and business.

“Strong work ethic goes a long way and communication with people is vitally important.”

Anderson coached Melbourne for 89 games across three seasons from 1998-2001.

Prior to that he enjoyed great success at the helm of the Canterbury Bulldogs where he also guided them to a premiership during his eight seasons.

He had a winning percentage of more than 60% at both clubs.

Anderson still maintains his Melbourne connection and came back to the Club as recently as last year for the traditional Old Boys weekend.

Now 64 years of age, it is that sense of family that continuously keeps the purple pride within him.

“Melbourne Storm are one of the Clubs that do it really well, keeping ahold of and respecting their tradition, their past,” Anderson.

“I try to get back for the Old Boys weekends when I can, nowadays every second one is probably as much as I can keep up with.

“It is always great to see blokes again that you have shared such good memories with and you get the opportunity to catch up on old times.”

The Club has a lot to be grateful to Anderson for.

Melbourne Storm today stands as a proud, passionate team, strong and united.

That does not happen if it were not for the hard work of legends such as Anderson who paved the way in those tough, formative years.

His visits to the Club may be infrequent now, but Storm will always have a place for its original master coach.